This is part I of our Urban Chestnut review! Check back later this week for Part II

St. Louis is a great place for craft beers.  Maybe you most associate STL with Anheuser Busch, this would be a mistake.  Ok, Bud Light is fine, I don’t find any reason to be too much of a beer elitist, but St. Louis is becoming a pretty craft big beer town.  There’s a number of amazing craft breweries that are too often overlooked.  A relatively recent development in the STL beer scene is Urban Chestnut.  Urban Chestnut strikes this really interesting balance between “revolutionary” urban beers and “reverential” traditional beers.  This dialectic creates a good and diverse balance between beers.

urban-chestnut-brewing-company

We tried four beers over all, here are our notes from the first two!

ErlKonig (Elf King) 8.3 ABV

Pour: Hazy, orange, beige foam, good head, from bottle, drink it out of a motherfucking stein

Nose: Yeast, cloves, spices

Palate: Grainy, boozy malt, wheat oranges or some kind of citrus

Mouthfeel: medium carbonation, somewhere between medium and heavy bodied

UCBC-Erlkonig-TTB3

A really nice beer. Goes well with pizza and probably everything else.  Also, the ABV is surprisingly high, you definitely get the start of a nice buzz after a bottle.  ErlKonig is part of the Urban Chestnut revolution series and I can definitely see why.  ErlKonig is a pretty cool twist on a weizen bock.

Pierreā€™s Wit 5.10 ABV 

Pour: small white head, Weizen glass, cloudy golden apricot color,

Nose: Coriander, dry wheat

Palate: Coriander, Citrus, Orange, Wheat

Mouthfeel: Dry, medium mouthfeel a little creamy.

Urban-Chestnut-Pierres-Wit-Wheat-AlePierre’s Wit, coming from the reverence side of Urban Chestnut, fits the bill perfectly for a Belgian Witbier.  The coriander was probably my favorite part of the beer.  I’m a sucker for coriander in beer.  For obvious reasons, Pierre’s Wit reminded me a lot of New Belgium’s Trippel.  Though, I think the biggest difference, and also why I like Pierre’s Wit better, is the creaminess and sweetness of the beer overall.